WFIT Features

Domenico Scarlatti
NPR

Not all of the great composers were accomplished performers, but there were some who were regarded as the virtuosos of their day. They wrote music for themselves to perform, of course, and once in a while they wrote passages so difficult that few -- if any -- other performers could play them.

We'll look at some demanding works by Bach, Beethoven, and Scarlatti this week.

Then it's wind-ensemble music by one of Bach's sons and a concerto in the Mannheim style -- both of which signaled a break from the Baroque practices as the new classical forms were taking over

NPR

The Most Serene Republic of Venice tended to do its  celebrations in a big way. And what could be greater cause for celebration than a naval victory over the Ottoman Turks in 1571? It called for an annual grand vesper service in the cathedral. This week we have a re-creation of what the festivities might have sounded like in the early  17th century with music of Viadana, Monteverdi, both Gabrielis. Palestrina, and others.

The 1919 premiere of the Elgar Cello Concerto was a disaster due to a rehearsal schedule that bordered on sabotage. As a result the concerto was pretty much consigned to the musical scrap heap until 1965, when English cellist Jacqueline du Pre restored it to its rightful place in the concert repertoire in a breakthrough recording that, incidentally, made her a classical superstar of the sixties. She was twenty years old. Tragically, her career would only last another seven years.

LOVE 4 ORLANDO / NEW TIME / ANNIVERSARY!

This Week on 'On The FlipSide' w/ Java John Goldacker (Saturday 6-8pm), I'll spend the whole show playing songs in memory of those we lost in the Pulse tragedy in Orlando last weekend.
THEN I will continue that tribute on Monday Night when "OTF" moves to it's NEW TIME-SLOT!! Monday Evenings 7-10pm eastern time.

Wilhelm Furtwängler
NPR

Wilhelm Furtwängler was the conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra during World War II.

His legacy is complicated. By virtue of his podium, he was by far the most prestigious musician to remain in Germany -- and the Third Reich used that prestige as its own. But Furtwangler was no Nazi. Indeed, parts of his story read like a chapter in Schindler's List.

Was he "Hitler's Conductor" or was he a subtle saboteur who made sure things went wrong when they needed to go wrong?

We'll look at his politics and his Beethoven -- both --  this Thursday night.
 

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