WFIT Features


This Week on 'On The FlipSide' w/ Java John Goldacker (Saturday 6-8pm), I'll spend the whole show playing songs in memory of those we lost in the Pulse tragedy in Orlando last weekend.
THEN I will continue that tribute on Monday Night when "OTF" moves to it's NEW TIME-SLOT!! Monday Evenings 7-10pm eastern time.

Wilhelm Furtwängler

Wilhelm Furtwängler was the conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra during World War II.

His legacy is complicated. By virtue of his podium, he was by far the most prestigious musician to remain in Germany -- and the Third Reich used that prestige as its own. But Furtwangler was no Nazi. Indeed, parts of his story read like a chapter in Schindler's List.

Was he "Hitler's Conductor" or was he a subtle saboteur who made sure things went wrong when they needed to go wrong?

We'll look at his politics and his Beethoven -- both --  this Thursday night.

Dmitri Shostakovich
The Guardian

It took some gumption to write music for a production of King Lear in Stalin's Russia in 1941. Dmitri Shostakovich, already having  been denounced in Pravda during the Great Terror, composed a score of incidental music to accompany Shakespeare's tale of a ruler gone mad, betrayed by flatterers and angry at those who spoke truth to him.

Anyone for allegory?

In 1971, long after Stalin's death, he did it once again for a motion picture soundtrack.

Melbourne Civic Theatre's "The Price"

May 31, 2016

"The Price" Paid for Life's Choices 
Honoring the centennial of Arthur Miller's birth, theaters throughout the country have been staging revivals of the works of one of  America's playwright giants.  The Melbourne Civic Theatre has joined the parade with a powerful staging of "The Price" that runs through June 26. One of Miller’s last works for the stage, the two-act chamber drama tells the story of long estranged brothers-- Victor, a disheartened New York police sergeant, and Walter, a prosperous surgeon whose personal life is in shambles.

In 1880, someone suggested to Tchaikovsky that he write a piece of music to celebrate the upcoming 25th anniversary of the coronation of Alexander II.

Staying on the good side of the Czar was always a good idea, and Tchaikovsky wrote a festival overture to be performed in front of the new Moscow cathedral, then nearing completion. The Czar was assassinated, the concert cancelled, and the score went into a box for a couple of years until another suitable occasion came around.