WFIT Features

Mozart's music was the star of the 1967 film Elvira Madigan, and the Piano Concerto No. 21 will probably always be associated with that name. It's our featured work, and we'll follow it with two more concerti: an out-of-the-ordinary piece by contemporary Finnish composer Einojuhani Rauravaara  that's like nothing else on the concert stage, and a short double concerto by Gustav Holst.

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This week we'll hear another of the Mozart piano concerti -- this one a little earlier, the ninth -- performed on period instruments including a replica of the piano that Mozart himself often played.

Next we'll take a look at a popular song of the late 1500s, and see how four different 16th-century composers arranged it both for keyboards and for instrumental ensembles.

In the second hour, we'll hear a set of Satie's piano miniatures, Debussy's La Mer, and a ballet suite by Hindemith.

Mozart was a prolific composer of piano concerti, and we'll look at a few of these over the next several weeks, beginning with Number 20, the product of a burst of activity in the mid 1780s when he was writing music for his own performance purposes.

We'll follow Mozart with a realization of some dance music from the French Renaissance, and then a performance of Beethoven's Eroica Symphony using instruments and orchestral forces appropriate to Beethoven's day.

Steev Inglish is a singer, guitarist and harmonica player who was born in South London in 1950. He came to Cleveland Ohio in 1985 and has been a fixture on the U.S. blues scene for more that two decades.  His latest album is called Live n’ Kickin’.  It was great to have this bluesman in the perform in the studio with Brother Frank and Father Jay on Saturday Blues.

It's Bach's 331st birthday this Thursday and we celebrate it with two hours of organ works, choral music, suites, and harpsichord and string ensemble music -- barely scratching the surface of the body of work of this central figure in the development of Western music.

We'll have performances by E. Power Biggs, Glenn Gould, Virgil Fox, Gustav Leonhardt and the Collegium Aureum, Martin Galling, and a host of others, including both historically accurate recordings and a couple of interpretations that Bach wouldn't have expected.

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