WFIT Features

NPR

Mozart's Attic is chock full of music for the holiday season, and this week we'll begin with some Christmas music by Bach, Benjamin Britten's Ceremony of Carols, some ancient Hebrew texts and a modern piece by Ernest Bloch, and music from Antoine Brumel, Claude de Sermisy, and Lorenzo Perosi.
Then we'll devote the second half of the program to a performance of Olivier Messaien's Nativite du Seigneur. It's one of the major works in the organ literature of the last century, and Simon Preston performs it on the organ at WEstminster Abbey.

Carolann Bambara Demarest

Join me. 10-1 PM EST for a custom made soundtrack for the morning. From the season's transition from Fall to Winter. Missing those who are no longer with us . . . To Alice's Restaurant by Arlo Guthrie at high noon & a preview from my upcoming interview with Susan Graham White about her first album in 15 years.

You can get the recipe for Mama Stamberg's cranberry sauce by listening to any NPR station, but only WFIT will tell you how to make Nathalie Irene's turkey Tetrazzini to help you use up some of those Thanksgiving leftovers. It's an annual tradition on Mozart's Attic. We'll also feature some music of Massenet, Rameau, Satie, and Stravinsky on this week's program. And who knows, we might just get Luisa Tetrazzini to sing for us as well.

In 1929, Herbert Hoover was the newly-inaugurated President of the United States. Erich Maria Remarque published All Quiet on the Western Front, and Walt Disney took to animating a mouse. In May of that year, three of Europe's outstanding musicians headed to a recording studio in Barcelona. Cellist Pablo Casals, and violinist Jacques Thibaud, with pianist Alfred Cortot in a new role as conductor, met to capture the Brahms Double Concerto to disc. Some 88 years later, it's still regarded as an exemplary performance, and it will be our featured work this Thursday night.

NPR

This week we look at some recent music, written between the 1990s and 2012: seven post-modern works, none alike, that show stylistic growth in this new century while still retaining some of the "spice" from the avant garde music of the last. Henryk Gorecki, John Adams, Michael Torke, Naji Hakim, and more: we'll hear them this Thursday night.

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