WFIT Features

It’s Mardi Gras time.  Get out your white hanky and get ready to strut to some New Orleans Music.  Join us, Jeanne Kelly and Sister Mary, for that special second line beat on Fat Tuesday, February 28, 2017.

7:00 p.m. on WFIT 89.5 FM and streaming live at WFIT.org

The Renaissance gave us lots of religious and ceremonial music intended to uplift the spirit.

This week we ignore all of that and focus on the banquet halls, taverns and bawdy houses of England.

Music of the hedonists helped keep Merrie Olde England -- if not merrie -- at least distracted from the travails of life in difficult times.

Maybe it was a comet or an eclipse or something in the water.

Four contemporaries, working in four cities, completely apart, were all born within 25 months of each other, and these four came to define the style of the 18th century High Baroque. Yet their music is quite unalike.

We've got music of Bach, Handel, Scarlatti, and Rameau this week.

How’s your love life? Stevie Ray Vaughn can answer that question.   Are you a victim of unrequited love?  Perhaps you need Derek and the Dominoes.  Do you need a second chance?  Maybe Solomon Burke can help.  Does the direct approach work best for you?  If so - Muddy Waters is your man. 

Tune in this Tuesday @ 7:00 PM and SisterMary and Jeanne may jump start your heart.

Franz Listz
NPR / Getty

Franz Liszt transcribed all nine Beethoven symphonies for solo piano, and although he was known to perform at least some of them in concert, they were published with the amateur pianist in mind.

Just how many amateurs were actually capable of playing them is open to question. Listen to the Symphony No. 7 this Thursday and see what you think. After that, we'll have music from the Italian Baroque, and we'll conclude with a virtuoso work for cello by 20th-century Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly.

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