Mozart's Attic

Thursdays from 10pm-12am

Mozart's Attic is a classical music program featuring music from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Some of it is not frequently heard on air; other pieces are concert favorites from the symphonic repertoire, sometimes in rare or historic performances. There's plenty of vinyl, and sometimes even a bit of shellac.

You never know what you might come across in the attic. 

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

Paris at the turn of the century was a cauldron for the modern arts.

In music, there were three composers in particular, Debussy, Ravel, and Satie, who are now recognized as leading figures in what we call the Impressionistic School -- although they were not all that happy with that label.

We'll look at some of the work of these three -- pieces that helped to advance musical style past the 19th century Romanticism that was by now becoming rather tired.

Then we'll continue with the fifth in the series of the complete symphonies of Franz Schubert.

Disease, death, and other tragedies have never been a stranger to musicians: Beethoven and Mozart; Gershwin and Jacqueline Du Pre; Buddy Holly and Otis Redding -- for just a half-dozen examples.

When concert pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, it looked like the end of his career.

But Wittgenstein wouldn't accept that. Instead he commissioned piano works for one hand from several of Europe's leading composers. The most successful of these, Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand is the featured work on Mozart's Attic this week.

Anybody out there remember Beatlemania back in the 1960s?

Maybe you've heard about the commotion when Elvis burst upon the scene a few years earlier.

Lisztmania was like that in Europe in the 1840s.

Audiences went berzerk at this virtuoso pianist who played music considered unplayable except by himself.... or the devil.

So, did Liszt sell his soul in exchange for his skill -- as blues musician Robert Johnson was said to have done at that Mississippi crossroads a century later?

Franz Schubert didn't have much time to develop his art; his career was not much more than fifteen years old at the time of his death at age 31.

The program starts with a short organ sonata by Paul Hindemith. One of the many artists to leave Nazi Germany before the war, Hindemith eventually found himself in New Haven, Connecticut, where he was professor of harmony at Yale. He knew a thing or two about deft tonal shifts, as his organ writing well demonstrates. And those who like their organ music "spooky" will not be disappointed

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