Mozart's Attic

Thursdays from 10pm-12am

Mozart's Attic is a classical music program featuring music from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Some of it is not frequently heard on air; other pieces are concert favorites from the symphonic repertoire, sometimes in rare or historic performances. There's plenty of vinyl, and sometimes even a bit of shellac.

You never know what you might come across in the attic. 

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

Maybe it was a comet or an eclipse or something in the water.

Four contemporaries, working in four cities, completely apart, were all born within 25 months of each other, and these four came to define the style of the 18th century High Baroque. Yet their music is quite unalike.

We've got music of Bach, Handel, Scarlatti, and Rameau this week.

Franz Listz
NPR / Getty

Franz Liszt transcribed all nine Beethoven symphonies for solo piano, and although he was known to perform at least some of them in concert, they were published with the amateur pianist in mind.

Just how many amateurs were actually capable of playing them is open to question. Listen to the Symphony No. 7 this Thursday and see what you think. After that, we'll have music from the Italian Baroque, and we'll conclude with a virtuoso work for cello by 20th-century Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly.

A blasphemous work by a composer named on a red scare blacklist.

Or a profound ecumenical work by one of the greatest American musicians of the 20th century

Leonard Bernstein’s Mass elicited both opinions at its high-profile debut in 1971. Nowadays we wonder what all the fuss was about.

Decide for yourself as we hear the original recording this week, up in the attic.

How many degrees of separation are there between Richard Nixon, a North Sea fisherman and a bullfighter?

Not many at all.

Tune in this week and see how we connect them all together.

Erik Satie
Wikipedia

This week we take a look at some music with roots in Yemen, Morocco, Sudan,  and Sephardic Spain -- some ancient, some contemporary.

Then we devote the second half of the program to the world premiere recording of a major piano work by Erik Satie, written in 1892, played at its debut in that year, and possibly unperformed again for nearly a hundred years..

It all promises to make for a most unusual evening up in the Attic.
 

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