Mozart's Attic

Thursdays from 10pm-12am

Mozart's Attic is a classical music program featuring music from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Some of it is not frequently heard on air; other pieces are concert favorites from the symphonic repertoire, sometimes in rare or historic performances. There's plenty of vinyl, and sometimes even a bit of shellac.

You never know what you might come across in the attic. 

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

Jacques Offenbach
BBC

Although we'll be running a few decades ahead of Charles Dickens, we have A Tale of Two Cities of our own this week as we look at musical entertainment in Paris and London in the mid- to late-19th century with a program featuring music of Gilbert & Sullivan and Jacques Offenbach. The best of times? The worst of times? You decide as we check out the light opera scene in the French and English music halls.

Founded in 1964, Nonesuch Records was a budget label specializing in a then-unusual repertoire of chamber music, particularly that of the Baroque period. This turned  out to be excellent positioning for the Baroque and Renaissance Music Revival of a half century ago. Nonesuch released albums by the score, introducing the record-buying public to sounds -- and composers -- that many had never heard, or heard of, before. This week, we'll listen to tracks from a dozen or so of these old Nonesuch albums.

Different chamber organs, different acoustic conditions, modern instruments, period instruments, and plain-old different points of view among performers all combine to produce considerable variety in five different readings of five concerti by G.F. Handel. All five performances are correct, but that doesn't mean you can't pick the one you like best. Se what you think this Thursday night.

NPR

Thomas Tallis saw the reigns of all the monarchs of England's House of Tudor -- Henrys VII and VIII, Edward VI, "Bloody" Mary I, and Elizabeth the First. Talk about living in interesting times!

As a composer, he was so highly regarded that he was able to avoid being caught up in the religious strife of his times, and our featured work this week will be one of his distinctly Catholic masses, the Missa Salve Intemerata, a work rich in Medieval antiphon and plainsong.

It wasn't that long ago -- 1911 -- that the race to be first to the South Pole was underway by expedition parties under Raold Amundsen for Norway and Robert Falcon Scott for Great Britain. They both succeeded in reaching the pole, but Scott's party never made it back, dying of exposure en route. Ralph Vaughan Williams was commissioned to write some incidental music for a movie on the subject in 1948. He was taken by the story, and expanded his project into his Symphony No. 7, his Sinfonia Antartica, to depict the majesty of the seventh continent and the tragedy of the doomed expedition.

Pages