Mozart's Attic

Thursdays from 10pm-12am

Mozart's Attic is a classical music program featuring music from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Some of it is not frequently heard on air; other pieces are concert favorites from the symphonic repertoire, sometimes in rare or historic performances. There's plenty of vinyl, and sometimes even a bit of shellac.

You never know what you might come across in the attic. 

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

BBC

Many people know Gustav Holst's suite, The Planets, even if they're not quite sure where they've heard it before. Several of its themes have been "borrowed" to serve as background music for everything from commercials to science fiction films.  We'll start this week's program with The Planets as it was meant to be performed, with Sir Adrian Boult and the London  Philharmonic.

Then it's off to the theater with overtures to The Wasps and Egmont.

Comparatively little of the music Antonio Vivaldi wrote for the orphanage where he worked for thirty years was vocal. He was, after all, in charge of the orchestra, not the chorus. Once in a while, though, he filled in when the choral director's post was vacant, and when he did, he wrote music for the occasion.

We begin this week's program with the Vivaldi Magnificat, and continue with an hour of Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Italian music.

The Shostakovich cycle of Preludes and Fugues continues, and we wrap up the program with music of Bach and Wagner.

We're going to spend two hours with composers from central and eastern Europe this week.

We'll hear music from Renaissance Hungarian and Polish composers whose names are lost to us. Works of ethnomusicologists like Bartok and Kodaly, music of emigre composers like Rachmaninoff and Stravinsky, pieces by 19th century superstars like Liszt, and lots more.

The Russians are coming ---- and so are the Romanians, the Transylvanians, the Slovaks and others,  and we'll still barely scratch the surface of this rich olio of cultures.

Rachel Barton Pine
NPR

W.A. Mozart and American violinist Rachel Barton Pine both began their musical careers at about the same age -- three!

Joshua Bell
NPR

Few cities can match London when it comes to world class orchestras. From the Royal Philharmonic to the Academy of Ancient Music to the London Symphony to any of a dozen more, London has become one of the great centers of orchestral performance in today's world.

Since 1959, one of those great ensembles has been the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. In 2011, Sir Neville Marriner, the orchestra's founding music director passed his baton to a new-generation director, American violinist Joshua Bell.

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