Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5am to 9am
Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

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Business
3:19 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Natural Gas Giant Tries To Shift Gears

Workers move a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in 2010.
Ralph Wilson AP

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 3:54 pm

A drop in natural gas prices is hurting balance sheets across the petroleum industry. The second-largest natural gas producer in the United States — Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy — has been hit especially hard.

After 23 consecutive years of touting its increasing natural gas production, Chesapeake CEO Aubrey McClendon told investors during a conference call Tuesday that the company projects its gas output will drop about 7 percent in 2013.

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Asia
3:18 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Japan's Nuclear Debate Weighs Safety, Economics

Anti-nuclear protesters carry "No nukes" banners during a march in Tokyo last month. Protests against Japan's use of nuclear power have grown in the aftermath of the March 2011 Fukushima disaster.
Koji Sasahara AP

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:28 pm

At 6 p.m. every Friday — with the kind of precision timing the Japanese live by — the protests in downtown Tokyo begin.

Thousands of Japanese — young, old, in wheelchairs and on skateboards — shout anti-nuclear slogans from behind police barricades that snake around the office of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. Over the past four months, the protests have swelled; at least 75,000 people turned out at a recent demonstration.

Nobuyuki Miyazaki, an office worker, says this is the first time he's ever been to a demonstration.

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Environment
3:15 am
Wed August 8, 2012

A Clear And Present Danger: How Glass Kills Birds

Experts say glass buildings kill millions of birds every year. Scientists at Powdermill Avian Research Center are studying ways to help prevent this. Here, a volunteer tags a black hooded warbler in Rector, Pa., in May.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 12:05 pm

First of a two-part series. Read Part 2.

Modern architecture loves glass. Glass makes interiors brighter and adds sparkle to cityscapes. But glass also kills millions of birds every year when they collide with windows. Biologists say as more glass buildings go up, more birds are dying.

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Around the Nation
7:20 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Rocket Scientist With Mohawk Is Web Sensation

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 2:39 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. While NASA put a rover on Mars, audiences were riveted by the high- stakes landing, and also by some high hair. Bobak Ferdowsi was on the mission control team when suddenly, his haircut made him famous. It's a mohawk, streaked in red and with stars dyed on the sides of his head.

"Mohawk Guy" has become an Internet star. He says he gets a new haircut for each mission, with colleagues voting on the design.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Around the Nation
7:08 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Fire Alarms Blairs For Hours In Pa. Apartment

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 7:56 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with an awkward moment for the housing authority in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. A fire alarm went off inside an apartment building. Strobe lights flashed. A high-pitched screech went on and on. And building managers had to confess the problem. The switch to shut off the alarm was in a locked room, and the housing authority did not have the key. The same room contains access to an ATM. The alarm was shut off 16 hours later. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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