Marc Silver

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Goats and Soda
5:39 am
Sun December 14, 2014

How Can You Tell If Your Goat Is Happy? Now We Know!

A goat peeks its head through a wall in Dakar, Senegal.
Claire Harbage for NPR

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 12:40 pm

Goats are having a moment, and we're not just saying that because our blog is called Goats and Soda.

There are nearly 900 million goats in the world today, up from 600 million in 1990. The reason for this goat spurt is the growing popularity of goat cheese, goat milk and goat meat.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sat December 13, 2014

A Michel Du Cille Disciple Remembers His Late, Great Boss

A boy lies on a mattress on the floor of Redemption Hospital, a holding center for Ebola patients in Monrovia, Liberia.
Michel du Cille The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 13, 2014 4:18 pm

The friends and colleagues of Michel du Cille are in shock. They simply can't believe that the photographer with the deep voice and the gentle soul is gone. He died on Dec. 11 of an apparent heart attack while covering the Ebola crisis in Liberia for the Washington Post.

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Goats and Soda
10:47 am
Thu December 11, 2014

Wilbur Goes To Work: New, Very First-Class Video On Village Life

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 2:55 pm

Last week, Wilbur Sagunaraj took NPR by storm with not one, but two video premieres. The YouTube star was taking pump baths, drinking Goli soda and — to the dismay of some readers — dunking a chicken in water.

If you missed that wild ride, no worries. Wilbur is back!

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Goats and Soda
11:12 am
Wed December 3, 2014

World Premiere Videos: Wilbur Dunks A Chicken, Digs Into Indian Food

Wilbur Sargunaraj sings and dances about village life in India.
Wilbur Sargunaraj for NPR

Originally published on Thu December 4, 2014 12:43 pm

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Goats and Soda
11:06 am
Thu November 20, 2014

An NPR Photographer Looks Ebola In The Eye

Baby Sesay, a traditional healer in Sierra Leone, treated a child who later died, apparently of Ebola, and then became sick herself and went to a care center. As this photo was taken, her body seized up and she nearly collapsed.
David P Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 1:06 pm

Her eyes met the camera. She was there. And yet she wasn't there.

That's how NPR photographer David Gilkey remembers the moment last Saturday when he took a picture of Baby Sesay, a 45-year-old traditional healer in the village of Royail in Sierra Leone.

Sesay had tried to cure a sick little boy. The boy died, likely of Ebola. Then Sesay herself fell ill. She had come to a community care center a few hours earlier, walking in under her own power, to be tested for the virus.

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