WFIT

Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

Ways to Connect

We begin with a baroque hour featuring a battle suite for brasses by Samuel Scheidt, the seventh in our cycle of the eight symphonies of William Boyce, the Vivaldi Gloria, and an orchestral concerto by Johann David Heinichen -- once  the official composer to the most prestigious court orchestra in Northern Europe, now largely unknown.

Mozart's Attic begins with some dance music from the middle ages and then from a little bit later --  the 1400s.

Then we have some Renaissance music for double reed consort.

Next we begin a new series featuring the great violin concerti, beginning with the Brahms Concerto in D.

Harp music of Debussy, a piano trio by Jennifer Higdon played by the Lincoln Trio -- who recently gave a concert locally, Rimsky Korsakov's Russian Easter Overture, and harpsichord pieces by Balbastre and Couperin.

Mozart's Attic begins with some music for Good Friday written in 1645 By Heinrich Schutz.

From there we go to another of the short symphonies of William Boyce, an English composer following in the footsteps of Handel.

Then a suite for viols, a lute fantasy, and a troubadour song all written by late Renaissance composer John Dowland.

We continue with some heroic music for organ, brass, and percussion, Beethoven's Tempest Sonata, and some Masonic music of Mozart, and conclude with Debussy's only string quartet.

Was he a genius or was he nuts.... or maybe a little of both.

Canadian Pianist Glenn Gould  is particularly associated with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, though the composer wrote not one  note for the piano. How can a performer's interpretations be both oh-so-wrong yet simultaneously oh-so-right?

Or again... maybe it's a little of both.

Listen to Glenn Gould's Bach on this Thursday's Mozart's Attic, and see what you think.

It's St. Joseph's Day and Mozart's Attic celebrates all things Polish this Thursday night.

Chopin of course, but also Renaissance works from fifteenth- and sixteenth-century tablatures to the avant-garde of Krzystof Penerecki -- and lots more, including performances by Wanda Landowska, and one of the first recordings of Leopold Stokowski, then the conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Classical music of Poland: that's this Thursday night at 10, only on 89.5 FM WFIT and streaming live at WFIT.org.

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