Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

Ways to Connect

Musicians need to practice, and for organists this historically presented a problem: someone had to be engaged to pump a bellows to provide air pressure. One solution was the pedal harpsichord, a practice instrument that didn't require an assistant.

When the electric fan came along, there was no longer a need for a bellows, much less a bellows pumper. Soon the expensive and cumbersome pedal harpsichord disappeared as well -- until a revival a half century or so ago. This once nearly extinct instrument will be featured in a couple of Bach trio sonatas this week.

The Kaddish Symphony, dating from 1963, concludes the cycle of the three symphonies of Leonard Bernstein this week on Mozart's Attic. We'll also hear the composer's set of Symphonic Dances from West Side Story.
Then music of English Baroque composer William Boyce, piano music from Schubert, a horn concerto by Mozart, and some Russian liturgical music for men's chorus.

89.5 FM and streaming live at WFIT.org and on the NPR Music App.

Leonard Bernstein's music will again be featured this week with the Symphonic Suite from his film score for On the Waterfront, followed by his Symphony No. 2, a musical interpretation of W.H. Auden's poem, The Age of Anxiety.

 The second hour will be devoted to the German, French, Italian, and Spanish Baroque with music of Bach, Rameau, Vivaldi, and Soler.

This week we begin a cycle of the three symphonies of Leonard Bernstein with his Symphony No. 1, known as the Jeremiah Symphony, taken from the Book of Lamentations. We'll also hear his ballet score Fancy Free. These are two works that were written before Bernstein turned twenty-six.

Another look at Lenny in the first hour of this week's Mozart's Attic.

The program will also include an overture by Beethoven, and will conclude with Gustav Holst's most well-known work, The Planets.

Sunday night at 10 on 89.5 FM and streaming live at WFIT.org and the NPR Music App.

Last week's program featured  Carl Orff's settings of verses from the medieval manuscripts known as the Carmina Burana, in which the 20th-century German composer was able to evoke the spirit of the middle ages in a modern work for orchestra, chorus, and soloists. This week we'll go back to the  original tablature of eleventh- through thirteenth-century pieces and some realizations of how this music might have sounded a thousand years ago.

Pages