Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

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NPR

In 1892, Antonin Dvorak, rapidly becoming the toast of Europe, accepted the director’s post at a New York conservatory. The school – totally integrated racially and by gender – wanted a “name,” and Dvorak wanted an opportunity to study American music. Could there have been a better match? The conservatory didn’t last, but Dvorak’s music “From the New World” did. We’ll feature one of those works, the Cello Concerto, this week.

A keyboard duet can be anything from two kids picking out "Chopsticks" on an old upright piano to the cathedral-filling two-organ concerti of Antonio Soler.

We'll have a selection of music for four hands this week - some of it meant for the concert hall, some for the parlor; some of it virtuosic recital material, some mostly for fun.

And we'll leave the "Chopsticks" behind, thank you very much.

NPR

Late 19th-century Paris opera-goers felt cheated if their evenings-out didn't include a ballet scene somewhere in the performance. When Giuseppe Verdi was told that he had to write such a score and insert it into the drama, interrupting the action, he was apalled. When told that he had do do it if he wanted to make any money, he became more tractable. Hence our featured work this week: the ballet suite from Il Trovatore -- just for Paris.

Vermont Public Radio

Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite used to be one of those "Introduction to classical music" pieces than many first heard as children -- like Peter and the Wolf and The Nutcracker. The suite had its origins in Ibsen's play of the same name, a play not intended for children by any means, but the imagery of Grieg's music makes the scenes come alive to young and old alike. We revisit this old favorite as our featured work this week, up in the Attic.

Two years after being kicked out of the Salzburg Cathedral – literally, "with a kick to the arse" – Mozart returned to his hometown to debut his new Mass in C minor.

It wasn’t a peace offering to the archbishop, but rather an introduction of his new wife to Mozart’s family and old friends. She was an accomplished singer, and Mozart gave her a starring role.

Then the Mozarts went back home to Vienna and everlasting fame. The mass has become one of the iconic works in its genre, and it's our featured work this week.
Nobody much remembers the archbishop any more.

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