WFIT

Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

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Vienna at the turn of the 19th century: The young Beethoven was new in town and out to make his mark on the world. The elderly Haydn was wrapping it up after a long career in the courts of Austria-Hungary. Young and old in the musical center of Europe, they did much to define what we call classical music to this day.

NPR

A hippie string quartet? That's what it seemed like in 1973 when four youngsters from Seattle formed the Kronos Quartet (they then moved to San Francisco). In the 45 years since, they have recorded dozens of albums of music from the Renaissance to the avant-garde, from the native musical traditions of at least four continents, and from some of the more than 900 original works that they have commissioned.

Our spotlight is on the career of the Kronos this Thursday -- and that has been one long, strange trip.

We begin an hour of English music this Thursday with a historical recording of Vaughan Williams's Serenade to Music, a piece with lyrics by Shakespeare, written in 1938 to celebrate Sir Henry Wood's 50th anniversary as a conductor. The premiere performance featured solos by sixteen of the leading singers of the day, and right after the jubilee performance, Sir Henry marched everyone down to the studios to record the moment for posterity. We'll hear that performance, then we'll go back a few centuries to some actual music from the time of Shakespeare.

Wikimedia Commons

Space exploration, astronomy, cosmology and cosmogony: none of these were what Gustav Holst had in mind when he composed The Planets a little more than a century ago.

Curiously enough, however, the imagery of his music has become a frequent accompaniment to our explorations of the majesty and mystery of the solar system in the years since. Tune in this Thursday night and see what you make of it all.

The Brahms Requiem may not have done much for the salvation of souls, but it provided the salvation for the composer's career. Brahms's star was in serious decline in the 1860s, with his publishers dropping him following a disastrous debut of his first piano concerto -- an early attempt at a large-scale work.

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