Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

Ways to Connect

Igor Stravinsky
Erich Auerbach/Getty Images

With the coming of the 20th century, all the rules of music went out the window. Composers were free to do pretty much what they wanted, and if someone said, "Hey, you can't do that," They were ignored.

Music went in as many directions as there were people writing it. Some went retro, others pushed the envelope of what even constituted music, and others chose routes somewhere in between.

We've got a program of music written not-so-far-from Plymouth Rock this Thursday night.

We look back at the history of the Boston Symphony Orchestra this week, featuring a 1955 RCA Victor recording celebrating the Orchestra's 75th anniversary, narrated by Milton Cross, the voice of the Metropolitan Opera for fifty years.

We'll have century-old recordings of the orchestra, directed by  Karl Muck, performances under the baton of Serge Koussevitzky and others, and we'll even hear what Arthur Fiedler has to say about the Boston Pop

Arvo Part
NPR

We have music from Russia, Ukraine, and countries of the Baltic this week, ranging from Rachmaninoff's channeling of age-old Orthodox chant to some recently-written music from Henryk Gorecki, Arvo Part, and Valentin Silvestrov -- with some out-of-character organ music by Jean Sibelius included as well.

It's a lot of unusual music from ancient hymnody to piano miniatures that approach New Age sounds. As always, it all begins at ten o'clock on Thursday night.

Pages