Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

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Among Mozart's choral works, there are three masses that are masterpieces beyond question -- even though two of them, the Requiem and the Great C minor, were left unfinished.
We'll hear the other one, the Coronation Mass in C major this week.

Then it's music of Beethoven: The Choral Fantasy, the capstone of one of history's great performance disasters (hint -- it wasn't the fault of the music), and a couple of piano works by Schubert.

The Renaissance gave us lots of religious and ceremonial music intended to uplift the spirit.

This week we ignore all of that and focus on the banquet halls, taverns and bawdy houses of England.

Music of the hedonists helped keep Merrie Olde England -- if not merrie -- at least distracted from the travails of life in difficult times.

Maybe it was a comet or an eclipse or something in the water.

Four contemporaries, working in four cities, completely apart, were all born within 25 months of each other, and these four came to define the style of the 18th century High Baroque. Yet their music is quite unalike.

We've got music of Bach, Handel, Scarlatti, and Rameau this week.

Franz Listz
NPR / Getty

Franz Liszt transcribed all nine Beethoven symphonies for solo piano, and although he was known to perform at least some of them in concert, they were published with the amateur pianist in mind.

Just how many amateurs were actually capable of playing them is open to question. Listen to the Symphony No. 7 this Thursday and see what you think. After that, we'll have music from the Italian Baroque, and we'll conclude with a virtuoso work for cello by 20th-century Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly.

A blasphemous work by a composer named on a red scare blacklist.

Or a profound ecumenical work by one of the greatest American musicians of the 20th century

Leonard Bernstein’s Mass elicited both opinions at its high-profile debut in 1971. Nowadays we wonder what all the fuss was about.

Decide for yourself as we hear the original recording this week, up in the attic.

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