Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

Ways To Connect

We begin a series of concerti grossi by Antonio Vivaldi this week. The twelve little gems that comprise l'Estro Armonico were the first of his works to be published, and they spread his fame around various musical centers of Europe in the early 1700s. We'll look at some of the implications of that in upcoming weeks.

Paris at the turn of the century was a cauldron for the modern arts.

In music, there were three composers in particular, Debussy, Ravel, and Satie, who are now recognized as leading figures in what we call the Impressionistic School -- although they were not all that happy with that label.

We'll look at some of the work of these three -- pieces that helped to advance musical style past the 19th century Romanticism that was by now becoming rather tired.

Then we'll continue with the fifth in the series of the complete symphonies of Franz Schubert.

Disease, death, and other tragedies have never been a stranger to musicians: Beethoven and Mozart; Gershwin and Jacqueline Du Pre; Buddy Holly and Otis Redding -- for just a half-dozen examples.

When concert pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, it looked like the end of his career.

But Wittgenstein wouldn't accept that. Instead he commissioned piano works for one hand from several of Europe's leading composers. The most successful of these, Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand is the featured work on Mozart's Attic this week.

Anybody out there remember Beatlemania back in the 1960s?

Maybe you've heard about the commotion when Elvis burst upon the scene a few years earlier.

Lisztmania was like that in Europe in the 1840s.

Audiences went berzerk at this virtuoso pianist who played music considered unplayable except by himself.... or the devil.

So, did Liszt sell his soul in exchange for his skill -- as blues musician Robert Johnson was said to have done at that Mississippi crossroads a century later?

Franz Schubert didn't have much time to develop his art; his career was not much more than fifteen years old at the time of his death at age 31.

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