Jay Lamy (Jayski)

Mozart's Attic Host

Originally from central Massachusetts, Jay has called the Space Coast home for more than 30 years. He began his association with WFIT in the late '90s as a dumpster diver for office furniture in response to a broadcast plea for a new chair from a frustrated disc jockey. (WFIT has come a long way since.)

Soon he was answering phones during fund drives, doing other odd tasks about the station, and later taking on the job of sending out thank-you gifts and premiums to new and renewing members.

Tune in for Mozart's Attic Thursday nights from 10 pm until midnight.

 

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The 1919 premiere of the Elgar Cello Concerto was a disaster due to a rehearsal schedule that bordered on sabotage. As a result the concerto was pretty much consigned to the musical scrap heap until 1965, when English cellist Jacqueline du Pre restored it to its rightful place in the concert repertoire in a breakthrough recording that, incidentally, made her a classical superstar of the sixties. She was twenty years old. Tragically, her career would only last another seven years.

Wilhelm Furtwängler
NPR

Wilhelm Furtwängler was the conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra during World War II.

His legacy is complicated. By virtue of his podium, he was by far the most prestigious musician to remain in Germany -- and the Third Reich used that prestige as its own. But Furtwangler was no Nazi. Indeed, parts of his story read like a chapter in Schindler's List.

Was he "Hitler's Conductor" or was he a subtle saboteur who made sure things went wrong when they needed to go wrong?

We'll look at his politics and his Beethoven -- both --  this Thursday night.
 

Dmitri Shostakovich
The Guardian

It took some gumption to write music for a production of King Lear in Stalin's Russia in 1941. Dmitri Shostakovich, already having  been denounced in Pravda during the Great Terror, composed a score of incidental music to accompany Shakespeare's tale of a ruler gone mad, betrayed by flatterers and angry at those who spoke truth to him.

Anyone for allegory?

In 1971, long after Stalin's death, he did it once again for a motion picture soundtrack.

In 1880, someone suggested to Tchaikovsky that he write a piece of music to celebrate the upcoming 25th anniversary of the coronation of Alexander II.

Staying on the good side of the Czar was always a good idea, and Tchaikovsky wrote a festival overture to be performed in front of the new Moscow cathedral, then nearing completion. The Czar was assassinated, the concert cancelled, and the score went into a box for a couple of years until another suitable occasion came around.

Louis Moreau Gottschalk
thompsonian.info

Springtime and the great outdoors.  Beethoven captured one view of this; Aaron Copland another.  Or did he?

The strange tale of an iconic piece of American music this week, and we'll follow that with an hour of short pieces by other American composers. Gottschalk, Ives, Randall Thompson and more: it all begins at ten.

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