Dustin Dwyer

Dustin Dwyer is a reporter for a new project at Michigan Radio that will look at improving economic opportunities for low-income children. Previously, he worked as an online journalist for Changing Gears, as a freelance reporter and as Michigan Radio's West Michigan Reporter. Before he joined Michigan Radio, Dustin interned at NPR's Talk of the Nation, wrote freelance stories for The Jackson Citizen-Patriot and completed a Reporting & Writing Fellowship at the Poynter Institute.

Dustin earned his bachelor's degree from the University of South Florida. He's also lived in Colorado, California, Oregon and Washington D.C. He's always happy to explain - with detached journalistic objectivity - why Michigan is a better place to live than any of the others. 

Around the Nation
3:00 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Woman Recovers After Getting Shot Shielding Neighbor's Kids

Carmesha Rogers snuggles with her 4-year-old daughter, Kasharee, on Aug. 22, in Muskegon, Mich. Rogers sustained a gunshot wound to the head on July 9 after removing several neighborhood children from a gunbattle's line of fire. Rogers says her only thought was: "Just get the kids out the way. 'Cause I'd want someone to do that for my kids."
Natalie Kolb Mlive.com/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Last month, a disagreement on a residential street in Muskegon, Mich., turned into a deadly gun battle. Six men were armed, one man was killed, and dozens of shots sprayed in all directions.

At the house directly behind the gunfight, three children were playing on the porch.

This scenario is not as rare in America as we'd like to think. But what happened next is: As the bullets zipped past the children, one woman ran into the line of fire to try to save them.

'Basically A War Zone'

It wasn't quite yet dinnertime.

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Economy
3:01 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

6 Things Surnames Can Say About Social Mobility

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 4:31 pm

Using data on surnames dating back almost 1,000 years, economic historian Gregory Clark says he's found evidence that families rise and fall across generations at a much slower rate than anyone previously thought. And he says that rate remains constant across national boundaries and time periods.

Clark is writing a book about his research, and he says he's still working out some of his conclusions, but here are six possible takeaways from what he's found so far:

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Economy
3:00 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Movin' On Up? That May Depend On Your Last Name

New research suggests that success in life may be determined by ancestors from hundreds of years ago. The research finds that your chance of making it into the elite is the same in the United States as it is in South America, no matter when you were born.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 7:06 pm

Here is a question that social scientists have been pondering for years: How much of your success in life is tied to your parents, and how much do you control?

The academic term used for this is "social mobility." And a striking new finding from economic historian Gregory Clark of the University of California, Davis claims your success in life may actually be determined by ancestors who lived hundreds of years ago. That means improving opportunities across generations might be a lot harder than anyone imagined.

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Business
4:45 am
Thu April 26, 2012

After Backlash, Ethanol Industry Is Thriving

Young corn plants grow next to the Guardian Energy ethanol plant in Janesville, Minn. Five years ago, the U.S. government projected that in 2012, ethanol production would use up 30 percent of the nation's corn supply. Last year, it used 40 percent.
Glen Stubbe MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 1:28 pm

Five years ago, ethanol was seen as the next big thing to wean the U.S. off foreign oil. Then some studies on the corn-based fuel cast doubt on its environmental benefits, and auto companies turned their attention to hybrids and electric cars. The hype died off, but the ethanol industry is alive and well, driving a big change in America's corn consumption.

Rising up out of the corn fields outside Lake Odessa, Mich., is the ethanol refinery for Carbon Green Bioenergy. The company's CEO, Mitch Miller, says a lot of refineries were popping up when this one was built in 2006.

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