Carrie Johnson

Damon Fowler
damonfowler.com

Fiery soul-blues guitarist Damon Fowler was born and raised in Brandon, Florida, just outside of Tampa. He first picked up a guitar at the age of 12, and after being shown a few chords, quickly developed an affinity for the instrument. He also fell in love with the blues, and he was soon gigging regularly in small clubs in the Tampa Bay Area.

After their 1920s Berlin hit, the Threepenny Opera, Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill collaborated one last time with another entertainment, The Rise and Fall of the State of Mahagonny. We'll begin this week with the incidental music to Mahagonny as recorded by Lotte Lenya and friends in the 1930s.

From there we'll look at some short French pieces by Satie, Poulenc, Debussy, Alain, and Saint-Saens;  hop the channel to hear some Elgar and Gilbert & Sullivan;  and finish with Schubert's Trout Quintet.

Based on the celebrated novel by Daniel Wallace and the acclaimed film directed by Tim Burton, "Big Fish" centers on Edward Bloom, a traveling salesman who lives life to its fullest… and then some! Edward’s incredible, larger-than-life stories thrill everyone around him – most of all, his devoted wife Sandra. But their son Will, about to have a child of his own, is determined to find the truth behind his father’s epic tales.

INDIVIDUAL CAMP                  

Boys Ages 6 - 17

  Information/Registration

  

Session 1
June 6 - July 1

Session 2
July 11 - August 5Panther Swim School

Our program aims to educate both children and parents about water safety training and proper swimming techniques and is appropriate for novice to intermediate swimmers. Each of our classes is adapted to your child’s specific needs.

  This camp covers the basics in the sport of lacrosse, instructed by the Florida Tech Men’s Lacrosse coaching staff. Topics include catching, throwing, dodging, shooting, ground ball play, position defense, defensive checks, offensive and defensive team concepts.   More Info/Registration 

  Boys Entering Grades 3rd - 12th  

Session 1
June 13-16

Session 2
June 20-23

Softball Camp

Up your student’s softball game with Florida Tech’s softball coach Val Silvestrini! This camp covers all fundamentals of the game including throwing, catching, fielding, hitting and all defensive positions. Students are assigned to different groups according to age and skill level. Beginners, intermediate and advanced players are encouraged to attend.

Ages 8-14

  Learn the sport of tennis and have fun too.  The goal for the camp is to make sure all players have fun and are focused on improving their skills.  3 different camps are offered Tennis, Tennis and Chess and Advanced Tennis.  More Info

 

School of Rock Summer Camp July 11-15th   9 a.m.–4 p.m.  Final Concert July 15th  7 p.m. in Gleason Auditorium.  Info & Registration

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Kilt the Messenger Live in Studio at WFIT

In early 2009, in a dimly lit, smoke filled bar on the East Coast of Florida, Kilt the Messenger powered up their guitars, struck in their bagpipes and introduced a small crowd to a brand of indie punk rock, the likes of which few had heard before.
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Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Early this year, President Obama granted clemency to seven men with ties to Iran, part of a high-profile prisoner swap that left some in federal law enforcement circles seeing red. Among the detainees who won release were men accused of breaking export-control laws by shipping sensitive materials to Iran.

But this month, the Justice Department signaled it remains determined to bring cases over export violations, even if it takes a long while for justice.

An ongoing FBI inquiry into Hillary Clinton's private email server has dogged the Democratic presidential candidate on the campaign trail.

Federal agents want to know if any U.S. secrets were compromised through Clinton's unusual setup when she worked as secretary of state. Clinton has not been named as a target of the FBI probe. But there's a long history of top officials getting scrutiny over classified information (see below).

The Justice Department's No. 3 official, Stuart Delery, is resigning to explore options in the private sector, leaving as the highest-ranking openly gay leader in the agency's history.

The chief judge of the federal district court in Washington, D.C., notified the White House he would retire this week, the same day a Utah woman filed a lawsuit accusing him of assault and predatory sexual behavior 35 years ago, when he was a civil rights prosecutor and she was a 16-year-old eyewitness in a murder case.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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