WFIT

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Weeks before President Trump and Kim Jong Un are scheduled to meet for a daylong summit, there is growing uncertainty over how the meeting will go — or whether it will even take place.

The meeting was originally scheduled for June 12, but Trump now says it "may not work out" that day. "If it doesn't happen, maybe it will happen later," he said, after a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in to discuss strategy.

Lava from the Kilauea volcano is pouring into the Pacific Ocean off of Hawaii's Big Island, generating a plume of "laze" – which Hawaii County officials describe as hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles — into the air. Officials say it's one more reason to avoid the area.

"Health hazards of laze include lung damage, and eye and skin irritation," says the Hawaii County Civil Defense agency. "Be aware that the laze plume travels with the wind and can change direction without warning."

A supporter of Catalan secession has become the new leader of the restive region in Spain, in a ceremony that didn't mention any loyalty to the Spanish constitution or the Spanish king, El Pais reports.

Catalonia's stymied bid for independence last fall has triggered a monthslong deadlock — a crisis that sometimes feels like it's unfolding in slow motion.

Someone appears to be producing a banned ozone-depleting chemical, interfering with the recovery of Earth's damaged ozone layer, according to a newly published study led by scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The illicit emissions are believed to be coming from somewhere in eastern Asia, but nothing else is known about the offender. It's a scientific whodunit — or rather, a who's-doing-it.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. Thursday.

When an NBA team interviews potential head coaches, it's a big deal on sports sites and the fan blogs. It gets a write-up in the hometown paper.

It's not usually headline news at the New York Times, The Washington Post, Vogue and Salon.

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