Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Mon May 18, 2015

President Gets His Own Twitter Account: 'It's Barack. Really'

President Barack Obama might have just gotten his own Twitter account, but he's been tweeting for years, such as during this "Twitter Town Hall" in 2011.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 8:59 pm

"Hello Twitter! It's Barack. Really." And with that, President Obama became part of the Twitterverse. The White House announced Monday that @POTUS would be "the official Twitter account of the President of the United States."

According to a post on The White House Blog:

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It's All Politics
5:20 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Train Derailment Highlights Amtrak's Infrastructure Needs

An Amtrak train leaves Chicago's Union Station on its way to Los Angeles.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 6:56 pm

Amtrak was formed in the 1970s out of the ashes of several bankrupt rail lines, including the Penn Central. Its has been criticized for poor service, and shaky finances, but its safety record has been good.

More than 31 million passengers rode Amtrak in fiscal year 2013, the last for which figures are available. In the Northeast Corridor, more than 2,000 trains operate daily on Amtrak's rails, between commuter lines and Amtrak trains. And far more passengers ride Amtrak between Washington, New York and Boston than fly.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Fast-Track Trade Measure Fails Key Test Vote In Senate

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 4:38 pm

Democrats in the Senate have blocked — for now — a vote on the fast-track trade authority that President Obama had sought and Republicans had supported.

The tally was 52 to 45 in favor, eight short of the 60-vote threshold needed to take up the bill.

It's a rebuke to Obama, who has made the trade bill a key part of his second-term agenda, from his fellow Democrats.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Christians In U.S. On Decline As Number Of 'Nones' Grows, Survey Finds

A cross stands above St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 1:14 pm

The U.S is home to the most Christians in the world, but the number of Americans who identify as Christian is declining, according to a newly released survey by the Pew Research Center. The survey of more than 35,000 Americans also found the number of people who consider themselves unaffiliated with any religion, or "nones," is growing.

According to Pew:

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News
5:09 pm
Mon May 11, 2015

It's Infrastructure Week: More Potholes Than Tax Dollars To Fill Them

All roads lead to Congress as states and the construction industry vie for limited federal funds for infrastructure.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 5:49 pm

This is National Infrastructure Week in Washington, D.C. That's when serious policy wonks, along with the construction, labor groups and other related industries, hold conferences, raise awareness and maybe most important, lobby Congress on behalf of road, bridge and other brick and mortar and concrete improvements.

There is added urgency to their efforts this year, as federal highway building money is set to run out, probably sometime this summer, and so is the government's authority to spend what little money it has left.

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