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Antonin Scalia was just one of six Roman Catholic justices on the Supreme Court, but in his devotion to the faith he was second to none. Neighbors saw him and his wife Maureen worshipping frequently at St. Catherine of Siena in Great Falls, Va., a church Scalia was said to favor because it was one of the few Catholic parishes in the Washington, D.C., area that still offered a Latin mass.

On a frigid morning in Washington, the flags fluttered at half staff. Under a cloudless sky, the Supreme Court building looked brilliant.

A small American flag was draped at the foot of the steps and mourners placed flowers and candles to pay tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia.

Bill Follett, a trial judge from California, was visiting Washington with his family. He stood right in front of the memorial for a moment.

At an open-air mass in a poor, crime-ridden suburb of Mexico City, Pope Francis excoriated inequality, corruption and the temptation of wealth.

The pontiff called out the rich and elite of Mexico, Reuters writes:

"Decrying 'a society of the few and for the few,' he denounced deep inequality and the vanity and pride of those who consider themselves a cut above the rest.

Just a few days ago, major world powers announced they would work on a plan to stop hostilities in Syria within a week. The proposed agreement would be temporary, and would fall short of a full cease-fire.

Instead, the nations involved have agreed "to encourage their proxies to cease hostilities in a week with an eye to a more permanent cease-fire down the road," NPR's Michele Kelemen explained Friday.

Since then, fighting on the ground has only intensified.

The Appointment Clause of the Constitution (Article II, Section 2, clause 2) states the President "shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint ... Judges of the supreme Court."

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