The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Ga. Parents, NAACP Demand Teacher's Firing Over 'Slave' Math Problem

The debate over a math problem at a Georgia elementary school intensified today with parents protesting and the Georgia NAACP calling for the teacher who wrote the math problem to be fired.

At issue is a third-grade worksheet that included references to slaves filling baskets with cotton and this question: "If Frederick got two beatings per day, how many beatings did he get in one week? Two weeks?"

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It's All Politics
3:19 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Door-To-Door In N.H., Mormon Youth Get 1 Question: 'Huntsman Or Romney'?

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman makes his way through the media as he leaves a polling station in Manchester, N.H. on Jan. 10. He's one of the candidates two young Mormons are often asked about as they proselytize.
ADAM HUNGER Reuters /Landov

If campaigning for Republican presidential candidates in New Hampshire sounds like hard work, try going door-to-door before the primary — for Jesus. Ike Sriskandarajah of TurnStyleNews.com, a production of Youth Radio, spoke with two Mormon missionaries in Exeter, N.H., to hear how they ride the line between proselytizing and politics.

As Sriskandarajah reports on All Things Considered Tuesday, most canvassers wear candidates' buttons and carry campaign signs.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:10 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

To Understand Health Overhaul, Try A Comic Book

Kaiser Health News

Health care reform is no laughing matter, but MIT economist Jonathan Gruber's new comic book on the subject aims to communicate some pretty complicated policy details in a way that, if not exactly side-splitting, is at least engaging.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Israeli Bill Would Make It A Crime To Use Nazi Comparisons

In Israel, it might become a crime to use Nazi comparisons to criticize someone. As the AP puts it, a bill under consideration by parliament would "would impose penalties of up to six months in jail and a $25,000 fine for using the word 'Nazi' or Holocaust symbols for purposes other than teaching, documentation or research."

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Corey Flintoff is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. His journalism career has taken him to more than 50 countries, most recently to cover the civil war in Libya, the revolution in Egypt and the war in Afghanistan.

After joining NPR in 1990, Flintoff worked for many years as a newscaster during All Things Considered. In 2005, he became part of the NPR team covering the Iraq War, where he embedded with U.S. military units fighting insurgents and hunting roadside bombs.

All Tech Considered
2:05 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Can Two Smartphone Also-Rans Rescue Each Other?

Nokia President and CEO Stephen Elop introduces the Lumia 900 smartphone during a CES news conference in Las Vegas.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 4:37 pm

Not too long ago Nokia was the largest tech company in Europe. Its market cap rivaled Microsoft's. It helped create the mobile phone industry as we know it. But the emergence of a new generation of smartphones — led by Apple's iPhone and Android-based offerings from Samsung, HTC and others — left Nokia behind.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Georgia Will Merge Eight Colleges To Save Money

Eight colleges in Georgia will now become four, the State Board of Regents announced today. The move wil affect about 36,000 students and was proposed in an effort to save money.

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Asia
2:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

In India, The Pressure Cooker Of College Admissions

Competition for admission to India's top school, Delhi University, is particularly fierce. Here students fill out forms at the Arts Faculty in New Delhi, India, on June 21.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 10:41 am

This can be a harrowing time for high school seniors and their parents in the U.S. as they wait to hear from college admissions offices. But the pressure can be equally intense, if not more so in India, where the massive number of applicants and one make-or-break exam keeps students on edge.

Admission to Delhi University, one of India's most prestigious schools, is considered as tough, if not tougher than the process at many leading schools in the U.S.

"It's a very difficult game, given the numbers," says Dinesh Singh, the vice chancellor of Delhi University.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:56 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Binge Drinking: Risky And Widespread

A man who has five drinks or more at one sitting is bingeing.
iStockphoto.com

Binge drinking in America looks to be an even bigger problem than we thought.

About 1 in 6 Americans, or 17 percent of the population, went on at least one drinking binge in a month last year, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That works out to 38 million people.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Panel Says N.C. Should Pay $50K To Victims Of Forced Sterilization

The victims of a North Carolina program that forcibly sterilized thousands of people should receive $50,000 in compensation, a task force said Tuesday. The AP writes that this is first time, the state tries to make up for a eugenics program that ran from the 1930s until 1977.

Before any payments are made, however, the state Legislature must approve the panel's recommendation.

The AP reports:

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