Planet Money
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

The History Of Factory Jobs In America, In One Town

A shuttered cotton mill in Greenville County, South Carolina
scmikeburton Flickr

For more, see Adam Davidson's cover story in this month's issue of The Atlantic.

Greenville County, South Carolina is where manufacturing's past and future live side by side. This is not a metaphor; it's a visible fact. In South Carolina, and throughout America, factories produce more than ever. Yet in Greenville, there are abandoned textile mills everywhere you look.

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Economy
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Project's Promise Of Jobs Has Appalachia Seeing Stars

Visitors view a photo montage of Royal Dutch Shell's Ethylene Cracker Complex during its opening ceremony in Singapore in 2010. The company is expected to announce plans soon for an ethylene cracker plant in Ohio, Pennsylvania or West Virginia.
Munshi Ahmed Bloomberg

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 3:42 pm

Ever since the collapse of the domestic steel industry, blue-collar workers living in the mountain towns near the border of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio have struggled to find jobs.

But last June, Shell Oil Co. announced it would build a huge petrochemical refinery somewhere in that Appalachian region. The plant, known in the industry as a "cracker," could bring billions of investment dollars and thousands of jobs.

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World
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

In Russia, Modern 'Revolution' Comes At Its Own Pace

The Russian village of Sagra has been in the headlines since last summer, when residents — including 56-year-old Viktor Gorodilov (shown here) — successfully fought off an armed criminal gang that they say threatened their community. For many Russians, Sagra has become a symbol of how they say the government has let them down.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:08 am

Russia had one of the world's most famous revolutions nearly a century ago, in 1917. Yet for centuries, the country has seemed to prefer strong leaders who promised stability rather than revolutionary change. On a trip across Russia today on the Trans-Siberian railroad, NPR's David Greene found many Russians who expressed disappointment with their current government. But most said they wanted changes to be gradual, and were not looking for a major upheaval.

Second of three parts

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It's All Politics
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Some At RNC Meeting Say It's Romney's Race To Lose

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney greets supporters during a campaign rally in Columbia, S.C., on Wednesday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:39 am

The annual winter meeting of the Republican National Committee got under way in New Orleans on Wednesday, just hours after Mitt Romney won New Hampshire's Republican presidential primary.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Gingrich, Romney Go At It Over Abortion

Technology
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Critics See 'Disaster' In Expansion Of Domain Names

mipan iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 5:28 am

Vast new tracts of the Internet are up for sale as of Thursday. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, known as ICANN, is forging ahead with plans to sell new domain categories despite some vocal opposition from regulators and advertisers.

Forget .com or .org — for a registration fee of $185,000, applicants can register a new suffix like .music, or perhaps a brand like .NPR. If you think of the Internet as virtual land, new continents are now on the block.

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The Salt
6:09 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Did Food Safety Auditors Cause The Fatal Outbreak From Tainted Cantaloupes?

Melons were left to rot in the field at Jensen Farms after it was identified as the source of a fatal listeria outbreak.
Ed Andrieski ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 1:02 pm

Private auditors paid to review food safety at the Colorado cantaloupe packer responsible for last summer's massive outbreak gave the facility rave reviews just before contaminated melons were shipped, which killed 30 people.

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The Two-Way
5:45 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Justice Department's No. 3 Stepping Down

Outgoing Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 5:53 pm

Associate Attorney General Tom Perrelli will leave the third highest-ranking post at the Justice Department in March after nearly three years managing a bustling portfolio that has run the gamut from mortgage abuses and the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to stamping out domestic violence in Indian country.

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The Two-Way
5:30 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Pentagon Disgusted, Marines Investigating Disturbing Video

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 5:31 pm

"The Marine Corps is promising to investigate a disturbing web video that appears to show [four] Marines in Afghanistan urinating on the bloody corpses of [three] alleged Taliban fighters," Gannett Co.'s Marine Corps Times reports.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:07 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Marathon Runners Face Low Risk Of Cardiac Arrest

Running long-distance races isn't going to hurt your heart any more than other vigorous sports, researchers say. Just make sure you're fit enough to attempt the feat in the first place.

In the past decade, nearly 11 million runners participated in long-distance races, but only 59 suffered cardiac arrests, according to findings just published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Most of the cases happened to be in runners with undiagnosed, pre-existing heart problems.

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