The Salt
4:45 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Is It Safe To Eat 'Pink Slime'?

"Lean, finely textured meat" made from beef trimmings is often added to ground beef as a cheap filler
Daniel Acker Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:48 am

"Pink slime" has been oozing back into headlines in recent weeks after McDonalds, followed by other fast food chains, announced it had stopped using beef trimmings to fill out its hamburgers.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Mining Company Pleads Guilty In 2007 Utah Mine Disaster Case

Coal mining company Genwal Resources has pleaded guilty to corporate criminal charges stemming from the 2007 Crandall Canyon mine collapse in Utah that left nine miners and rescuers dead.

Federal prosecutors say a plea agreement includes a provision that no criminal charges will be filed against any individuals in the case.

Federal and congressional investigators blamed the an initial mine collapse on "retreat mining," in which pillars of coal holding up the roof of the mine are dug out, causing collapse of the mine behind them.

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Rebuilding Japan
4:32 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

Last year's earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Foreign journalists saw cleanup and recovery work in process on Feb. 28.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, lasted for many terrifying minutes. But the multiple nuclear meltdowns that followed created an emergency that lasted for weeks and a legacy that will last for decades.

Here's how the event unfolded. The tsunami knocked out power to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. As a result, the cooling systems failed and three reactors melted down. Steam laced with radioactive material poured into the air. Water contaminated with radiation also flowed into the sea.

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The Two-Way
4:28 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Mormon Church Limits Access to Controversial Baptism Records

Sunrise hits the Mormon church's temple in Salt Lake City.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:12 pm

Persistent pressure and criticism have prompted the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to erect a new "technological barrier" in the system used for controversial posthumous or proxy baptisms.

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Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Haven Or Hell: Refugees In Idaho Struggle For Work

Nowela Virginie and her daughters often visit social worker Marcia Munden at Catholic Charities of Idaho.
Molly Messick StateImpact

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 1:49 pm

In the last few years, more than 4,000 refugees have found their way to a far-flung spot: Idaho. Most of the state's incoming refugees come to Boise. For years, the city's strong economy, good-quality affordable housing and supportive community created an especially favorable environment for refugee resettlement. The recession has shifted that picture.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Harry Wendelstedt, Longtime Baseball Umpire, Has Died

This 1998 file photo shows veteran National League umpire Harry Wendelstedt, left, with his son, Hunter Wendelstedt, also an umpire.
Mary Butkus AP

Harry Wendelstedt spent 33 years as a National League umpire, including five stints to the World Series.

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Africa
4:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

How Teenagers Learned To Hate Joseph Kony

Joseph Kony in southern Sudan in 2006. His exact whereabouts today are unknown.
STR AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:25 pm

If you're a teenager, you probably hadn't heard of Joseph Kony last week. This week, you probably couldn't avoid him.

"If I log onto Facebook or Twitter any time during the day, it's my entire news feed, basically," says Patrick Franks, an 18-year-old senior at Loyola Blakefield High School, outside Baltimore.

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Europe
3:46 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

A Health Care Tragedy Plays Out In A Greek Port

Near the port of Piraeus and about 10 miles west of Athens, Perama developed after the Greek civil war of the 1940s, growing prosperous in the 1980s thanks to the ship-repair industry.

But now, the once-bustling piers are deserted. A few rusting skeletons of unfinished boats stand outside empty, abandoned warehouses.

That's because business migrated to low-cost Turkey and China, and in a few short years, industry jobs dropped from 4,500 to 50.

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Rebuilding Japan
3:41 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March.
Doualy Xaykaothao NPR

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 10:22 pm

Teacher Dave Rowlands is talking to his students in a kindergarten class at Imagine Japan, an English-language school in the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai City. The school is just a short walk from pre-fabricated homes built for families who lost more than just property in the earthquake and tsunami last year.

"What came after the earthquake, was what?" Rowlands asks. "A tidal wave. In Japanese, what do we say? Or in English, actually, tsunami is now used around the world in many languages. Tsunami. We kind of leave the 't' off of there."

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The Picture Show
3:19 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

In Battle For Rhino Horns, A Clash Of Cultures

A white rhino cow (left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa.
Brent Stirton National Geographic

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers have been killing or darting rhinos with tranquilizers for their horns.

Rather than adorning walls, many horns are ground up into medicines, sold mostly in Southeast Asia. A possible — yet controversial — way to stop poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale and the animals are allowed to grow new ones.

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