Arts & Life
4:55 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Kansas Arts Budget Restoration Builds Goodwill

Children rehearse for a production of The Wizard of Oz at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, Kan.
Stephen Koranda Kansas Public Radio

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

Last year, Kansas became the first state in the nation to completely eliminate arts funding. Republican Gov. Sam Brownback has always said he supports the arts, but when the state was facing a tight budget, he said Kansas needed to cut back.

"As we look to grow Kansas' economy and focus state government resources to ensure the most efficient use of taxpayer dollars, we must do all we can to protect the core functions of state government," he said.

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Around the Nation
4:43 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

A Damned Dam On The Penobscot River

Next week, the Great Works Dam on the Penobscot River in Maine will be removed.
John Clarke Russ Bangor Daily News

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

Like most members of the Penobscot Nation, Scott Phillips grew up near the Penobscot River and learned to paddle and fish as a young boy. He took to it like a duck to water. He became a competitive racer and eventually opened his own business selling canoes, kayaks and other outdoor gear.

Next week, the first of two dams on the river will be removed, altering the way it's used recreationally. The change could also be a boon to Phillip's business.

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Author Interviews
4:13 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Steve Guttenberg Writes His Own 'Bible'

Steve Guttenberg (left), Michael Winslow (center) and G.W. Bailey star in 1987's Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol, part of the film franchise launched by 1984's Police Academy.
Warner Bros./Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:41 pm

When Steve Guttenberg was 16, he went to see an agent about starting his acting career.

That agent told him: "You are the last guy I would pick to be a movie star."

Guttenberg decided to become an actor anyway.

The summer before he was supposed to start the University of Albany, he moved from Long Island to Los Angeles to try his luck. Once there, he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, he snuck onto the Paramount Studios lot, set up his own office, and started making phone calls to agents and producers.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Spain, Eurozone Agree To 'Financial Support'

"The Spanish government states its intention to request European financing for the recapitalization of banks that need it," Spanish Economy Minister Luis de Guindos said at a press conference on Saturday.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 6:37 am

Spain will ask, and European finance ministers will agree, to offer up financial aid for the country's struggling banks.

Spanish and eurozone officials announced their intentions after a three-hour emergency conference call on Saturday. If they make good on it, Spain will be the fourth – and largest — member of the 17-nation eurozone to receive outside help as Europe's debt crisis marches on.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
1:31 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

The Movie Jared Harris Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Dustin Hoffman in Sydney Pollack's 1982 film, Tootsie.
Columbia / The Kobal Collection Columbia

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:28 pm

The Weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actor Jared Harris, whose credits include The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, and AMC's TV drama Mad Men, the movie he can't get enough of is Sydney Pollack's Tootsie. "It's just so brilliant," says Harris.

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Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

'Call Me Maybe': Behind The Song Of The Summer

Carly Rae Jepsen is the 26-year-old singer behind the inescapable pop hit "Call Me Maybe."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 11:57 am

"It's happened a few times, yes," Carly Rae Jepsen says. "And they usually think that they're the first person to do it."

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The Salt
10:13 am
Sat June 9, 2012

To Grow A Craft Beer Business, The Secret's In The Water

Craft brewers are reaching markets far from their home breweries. In a Washington, D.C., store, beers from California, Colorado, Louisiana, Vermont, and elsewhere are for sale.
Bill Chappell NPR

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 9:47 pm

It's a good time to be a craft brewer, as Americans are thirsty for full-flavored and local beers. But when small breweries grow, they can also risk losing some of the "craftiness" their fans love. And when they expand, many brewers have to rewrite their recipes — starting with the water.

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Around the Nation
6:09 am
Sat June 9, 2012

Saving Niagra Falls, One (Tightrope) Step At A Time

Nik Wallenda walks a tightrope in the rain during a training session for his upcoming stunt in Niagara Falls, N.Y.
Gary Wiepert AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:42 pm

Niagara Falls has long been a magnet for daredevils, but strict laws have kept them away for more than a century. That's expected to change Friday, when circus performer Nik Wallenda will walk a two-inch-thick wire above the giant waterfall. It's an exception officials hope will rescue tourism — and the city's economy.

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World
6:08 am
Sat June 9, 2012

The Young And The Jobless: Hopes On Hold In Spain

Graffiti on a wall in Madrid reads, "We want to work, let the businessmen who have gotten rich from our labor pay for the crisis." Nearly 50 percent of young adults in Spain are unemployed.
Denis Doyle Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 9:46 pm

The crowd of job seekers at an unemployment office in downtown Madrid looks different than it did a few years ago.

When the housing market went bust, construction workers flooded the lobby. Now, labor reforms have made it easier for corporations to fire workers without seniority. So now young people, including those with an education, are unable to find work.

Jaime Garcia de Sola, a former intern at an investment bank, was one of those waiting in the unemployment line.

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Animals
6:07 am
Sat June 9, 2012

Growling With The Gorillas: A Rwanda Mountain Trek

Gorillas rest in the Virunga mountains of Rwanda. More than half of the world's mountain gorillas live in the volcanic chain in East Africa.
Rebecca Davis NPR

Originally published on Sat June 9, 2012 10:58 am

It's not easy shaking a bad reputation. Take the gorilla, for example: It's been saddled with a sketchy rep for as long as anyone can remember. Something along the lines of big, hairy, ferocious and superhuman in strength. A bit daunting, perhaps. And yet folks who work with and study gorillas say they are as much gentle as giant. I recently had the opportunity to find out for myself thanks to a trip organized by the International Reporting Project that took us to Rwanda.

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