NPR Story
4:58 am
Tue June 19, 2012

More Civilians Joining Syria's Rebel Movement

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The opposition in Syria is increasingly taking up arms. They've been devastated by months of assaults by government troops loyal to President Bashar al-Assad

WERTHEIMER: The army offensive to crush the rebels has been so ferocious that a U.N. monitoring mission was suspended. But we're about to hear the sounds of the rebels fighting back.

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Music Interviews
3:17 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Killer Mike: On Ronald Reagan And Raising Daughters

Killer Mike's new album, his sixth, is called R.A.P. Music.
Courtesy of Life and Death PR

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 5:05 pm

Atlanta rapper Michael Santiago Render, known professionally as Killer Mike, released his sixth album this month. It's called R.A.P. Music. The album's title isn't about hip-hop, per se, but refers to an acronym tweeted by another Georgian, a critic named Maurice Garland, two years ago. "He just put it up randomly: 'Rap music is supposed to be Rebellious African People,' " Killer Mike told Morning Edition. "I said, 'Yo, i'm naming my next album that.' "

You can hear a portion of the show's interview with Killer Mike at the audio link, but keep reading for more.

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Energy
3:15 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Rio Environment Meeting Focuses On 'Energy For All'

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks during a news conference on June 7 at the United Nations headquarters in New York City. Ban wants to focus on making energy available to the poorest populations of the world.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

Diplomats and activists from around the world are meeting in Rio de Janeiro this week to talk about how the planet's growing population can live better lives without damaging the environment. The Rio+20 meeting marks the 20th anniversary of the United Nations Earth Summit in Rio, a watershed meeting to address topics as diverse as climate change and biodiversity.

At this follow-up meeting, delegates hope to highlight an issue that was almost absent from the Earth Summit: making energy available to everyone in the world.

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Revolutionary Road Trip
3:14 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Muslim Faction Has Its Roots In Cairo Coffee Klatch

Mohammed Tolba (center) talks with friends at a coffee shop in the Cairo suburbs. The 33-year-old Egyptian is trying to change the public perception of Salafists, Muslims who believe in a literal interpretation of the Quran.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is nearing the end of his Revolutionary Road Trip, a journey across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team began in Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, drove across the deserts of Libya, and filed this report from the third and final country, Egypt.

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Religion
3:13 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Southern Baptists See Their Future In A Black Pastor

The Rev. Fred Luter is running unopposed for the presidency of the Southern Baptist Convention. Here, he delivers a sermon during Sunday services at Franklin Avenue Baptist Church in New Orleans.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

The Southern Baptist Convention is expected to elect its first black president on Tuesday: Fred Luter, a former street preacher who turned a dying New Orleans church into a powerhouse. His election is a milestone for the 167-year-old denomination at a time when minorities make up a growing share of a shrinking membership.

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Politics
3:09 am
Tue June 19, 2012

A Fine Line: Distinguishing Issue Ads From Advocacy

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

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Business
3:07 am
Tue June 19, 2012

It's Taxis Vs. Limos In Laid-Back Portland

Portland, Ore., imposes two different fare structures on taxis and other kinds of short-trip vehicles. Two town car companies say those different rules are unconstitutional.
Thomas Hawk Flickr

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

With just over a half-million residents, Portland, Ore., is not exactly a major metropolis. In this bike- and mass-transit-friendly city, there are typically more bikes and buses plying the downtown streets than taxis and town cars.

So when Mike Porter wanted to drum up business for his town car company, he did what a lot of businesses do: He took out a Groupon ad, offering a discounted fare to or from the airport.

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Asia
3:06 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Confined To A Thai Fishing Boat, For Three Years

Vannak Prum of Cambodia was sold onto a Thai fishing boat where he was forced to work in miserable conditions for three years before escaping. Thailand's huge fishing industry is coming under increasing criticism for using trafficked workers who have been sold to unscrupulous ship captains.
Becky Palmstrom and Shannon Service for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 10:46 am

Thailand supplies a large portion of America's seafood. But Thailand's giant fishing fleet is chronically short of up to 60,000 fishermen per year, leaving captains scrambling to find crew. Human traffickers have stepped in, selling captives from Cambodia and Myanmar to the captains for a few hundred dollars each. Once at sea, the men often go months, or even years, without setting foot on land.

First of two parts

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U.S.
3:05 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Pentagon Revamps Rules On Reporting Sex Crimes

Producer Amy Ziering and Director Kirby Dick accept an award at this year's Sundance Film Festival for their documentary The Invisible War, which looks at sex crimes in the military.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 9:48 am

The Pentagon has announced new steps to deter assaults and make it easier to prosecute offenders, a move that follows President Obama's recent remark that sexual assault "has no place" in the U.S. military.

Still, many victims believe it will be difficult to change a military culture that makes it tough for the victims to report these crimes.

For victims, the nightmare starts with the attack. Many say that things get worse when they try to do something about it.

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Fine Art
3:03 am
Tue June 19, 2012

Vuillard: A Parisian Painter And His Jewish Patrons

Lucy Hessel, depicted above at the seaside in 1940, was Vuillard's friend, muse and lover for more than 40 years. She was also the wife of art collector and Vuillard supporter Jos Hessel. Vuillard was with Hessel when he died in June 1940.
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 3:19 pm

In 1940, a week after the Germans occupied France, a popular painter died of a heart attack outside Paris in the embrace of his powerful patrons. An exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York explores the life of Edouard Vuillard, a non-Jewish artist, and the circle of Jewish tastemakers who supported him.

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