It's All Politics
5:29 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

On The Trail, Even Republicans Spin Clinton Years Into Gold

What a difference 14 years makes. Here, Bill Clinton departs the White House on July 31, 1998, after telling reporters he wouldn't take questions about the Monica Lewinsky investigation.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

This week, the presidential campaign has been dominated by debate over the welfare law from the 1990s. It's just the latest example of how both sides are trying to use the Clinton years to their advantage — portraying them as a halcyon golden age.

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The Two-Way
5:21 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Publisher Pulls Controversial Thomas Jefferson Book, Citing Loss Of Confidence

Cover art for The Jefferson Lies
Thomas Nelson Publishers

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 8:44 pm

Citing a loss of confidence in the book's details, Christian publisher Thomas Nelson is ending the publication and distribution of the bestseller, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson.

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It's All Politics
5:19 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Obama Targets Romney On Tax Credit For Wind Energy Producers

President Obama at a Newton, Iowa, wind-turbine blade maker in May.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 6:12 pm

How many votes can President Obama gain or Mitt Romney lose because of the Republican's opposition to renewing federal tax credits to wind energy producers? The answer, with apologies to Bob Dylan, is blowin' in the wind.

Obama hopes to influence the answer by relentlessly pounding the all-but-official Republican presidential nominee's opposition to the renewal.

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Wish You Were Here: My Favorite Destination
5:17 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Wish You Were Here: Listening To Loons In Maine

Hearing the call of the loons is like "a blessing."
Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Writer Roxana Robinson's most recent novel, Cost, is set in Maine.

Mount Desert Island, off the coast of northern Maine, is known for dramatic scenery. Most of the island is Acadia National Park: steep forests, plunging down to a cobalt sea. Cadillac Mountain, the tallest peak, is the first place where light touches the American continent, each morning at dawn. Trails follow the windswept ridges; they wind along the smooth pink granite bluffs, rising from the deep, icy water, along the wild swirl of the great tides.

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

James Holmes, Colorado Shooting Suspect, Is Mentally Ill, His Attorneys Say

The attorneys for the James Holmes, the alleged Colorado shooter, say their client is mentally ill.

The AP reports the disclosure came during a hearing today at the Arapahoe (Colo.) County Courthouse in which news organizations, including NPR, were asking for documents in the case to be unsealed.

The AP adds:

"Holmes had the same dazed demeanor that he has had in previous court appearances.

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The Torch
5:01 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Ashton Eaton, Of United States, Wins Gold In Decathlon

Ashton Eaton of the United States smiles after competing in the Men's Decathlon Pole Vault in London.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:58 pm

The American Ashton Eaton can call himself the greatest athlete in the world, today.

With 8,869 points, Eaton took the gold medal in the decathlon. His American teammate Trey Hardee took the silver with 8,671 points.

If you're not familiar, the decathlon is the closest the sports world comes to a standardized test in athletic ability. It spans two days and 10 events, including the 100 meter dash, the long jump, the high jump and the shot put.

The final event is the 1,500 meter run. It's a grueling final metric mile. Eaton finished it easily with a time of 4:35.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Ashton Eaton, Of United States, Wins Gold In Decathlon

Ashton Eaton of the United States smiles after competing in the Men's Decathlon Pole Vault in London.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 5:04 pm

(This post appeared in our Olympics blog, The Torch.)

The American Ashton Eaton can call himself the greatest athlete in the world, today.

With 8,869 points, Eaton took the gold medal in the decathlon. His American teammate Trey Hardee took the silver with 8,671 points.

If you're not familiar, the decathlon is the closest the sports world comes to a standardized test in athletic ability. It spans two days and 10 events, including the 100 meter dash, the long jump, the high jump and the shot put.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

List Of Drug-Resistant Infections Continues To Grow

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Included on that growing list that Rob just mentioned: some strains of tuberculosis, strep, typhoid fever, malaria and MRSA - which is a staph infection. Mutations of these have outpaced new drug development. For more on drug-resistant infections, we're joined by Dr. Arjun Srinivasan. He works on this issue with the CDC. Dr. Srinivasan, welcome to the program.

DR. ARJUN SRINIVASAN: Thank you so much for having me.

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The Torch
4:22 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Usain Bolt Cements His Place In History, Winning 200 Meter Gold

Usain Bolt of Jamaica crosses the finish line ahead of Yohan Blake of Jamaica to win gold during the Men's 200m Final.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

Usain Bolt cemented his place as one of the greatest sprinters in history, when he won the 200 meter final today.

Bolt was challenged by his Jamaican teammate Yohan Blake, who closed in with less than 100 meters to go. Bolt kicked on his burners and ended up taking back the lead and beating Blake 19.32 to 19.44 seconds.

The big deal here is that this makes Bolt the first Olympian to win both the 100 meter and 200 meter races two Olympics in a row.

Warren Weir, another Jamaican, took third.

The AP adds:

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Shots - Health Blog
3:32 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:02 am

There's some disturbing news out today about a disease we don't hear about much these days: gonorrhea. Federal health officials announced that the sexually transmitted infection is getting dangerously close to being untreatable.

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